Tag Archives: TV

CanLit on Film – Volume 5

There have not been a great many TV shows based on Canadian books. Here are a few that I could think of; feel free to add somemore in the comments.

JPod

I haven’t read this Douglas Coupland novel, but it is on my to-read list (I loved Microserfs, and JPod is apparently an unrelated “sequel”). This show was very funny; in a way, it is a Canadian version of The Office. The show focuses on a group of video game programmers who work in JPod – thus named because all of their surnames all begin with the letter J. This show has a great mix of intellectual, low-brow, and awkward humour. Unfortunately, the show only lasted for one-13 episode season in 2008 before it was cancelled due to low ratings by the CBC (who stuck it in the Friday night death slot). | IMDB | DVD

Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures

This is based on Vincent Lam’s fantastic Giller Prize winning short story collection. I have not yet seen this show, but from what I’ve heard, it is well written, acted, and faithful to the source. This 2010 series was produced by TMN and ran for 10 episodes. It is not yet available on DVD, but it is available on many “on-demand” services. | IMDB

Jake and the Kid

There have been a variety of TV series adaptations of this W.O. Mitchell classic over the years. In fact, prior to TV productions, the CBC produced several radio adaptations between 1949 and 1954. The first, and probably best known, adaptation was a single, 13 episode, season produced by CBC in 1961. This show contains all of the warming hallmarks of 1960s family television. There was also a longer running adaptation that debuted in 1995, but this one is so poorly done that it is not even worth discussing. None of the series are available on DVD, but likely can easily be found online. | IMDB

Emily of New Moon

I really really don’t like this show. Everyone on Earth has seen this and its sister show Road to Avonlea. I’m just going to leave it at that. | IMDB | DVD

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CanLit on Film – Volume 4

Here is the second half of made-for-TV movies and miniseries based on CanLit:

The Robber Bride

This 2007 CBC adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s bestselling novel does an adequate job in telling this bizarre story. The movie has a decent cast, starring Mary-Louise Parker and Shawn Doyle in the leading roles. The Robber Bride hasn’t been released on DVD, but that is no great loss to civilization. If it is on TV or is streaming online somewhere it might be worth a watch, but I wouldn’t trip over myself or spend money to watch this. | Trailer | IMDB

Anne of Green Gables

This behemoth, 1985, made for TV epic of Anne with an E was a joint production between CBC and PBS. Everyone in North America has seen this and has been enchanted by Megan Follows’ portrayal of everyone’s favorite redheaded child. There were a few sequels to this miniseries, but unfortunately they didn’t measure up to the original. (Also, I just want to point out that Anne was not from the Island, she was originally from Nova Scotia – take that, tourists). | Part 1 on YouTube | IMDB | DVD

Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town

In 2012, CBC adapted Stephen Leacock’s best known book into a 1 hour TV movie. I am not sure how they managed to squeeze it in. I am honestly not a huge fan of this book – I much prefer Leacock’s Literary Lapses or Nonsense Novels to this collection. I recorded this on my DVR when it first came out but returned my cable box before I bothered to watch it. It looked like it was well made and starred Gorden Pinsent (who is AWESOME), so I’m sure it was ok. If I get an Indigo or Amazon gift card and I have nothing else to buy I might order this, but honestly I have no driving urge to see it. | Commercial | IMDB | DVD

Last of the Curlews

Fred Bosworth’s short novel The Last of the Curlews is one of my all-time favorite works of Canadian literature. It is heartbreaking on many levels, extremely well written, and has a moral without being even slightly preachy. This 1972 animated adaptation was done by none other than Hannah Barbera (The Jetsons, The Flintstones, Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, etc) and has the honour of being the first in the long running series of ABC Afterschool Specials. The animation is filled with that 1970s Saturday morning charm and is very close to the original story. My one problem with this adaptation is the narrator; he falls into the trap of being a snotty didactic preacher. But, I suppose since this is an afterschool special, whose job it was to teach, this can be excused. The whole special is on YouTube and definitely worth the watch. | Part 1 on YouTube | IMDB

The Diviners

Of all of the movies and miniseries I have mentioned in these last four blog posts, the 1993 CBC adaptation of Margaret Laurence’s magnum opus The Diviners is, without question, my favorite CanLit film. The casting is spot on (especially Sonja Smits in the role of Morag), the writing is phenomenal, the pacing is fantastic, and it is quite close to the book (there are a few omissions, but it is a massive novel). One of the great crimes against humanity is that this movie has not been released on DVD; it was released on VHS but is only ever available at academic libraries – and is usually in poor shape. I first saw this on Showcase in 2003 when I was getting ready to read the novel for a Canadian fiction course; it excited me so much that I ripped through the 500 page book in 3 days. In 2007, Bravo broadcast this movie and I recorded it on my DVR and then watched it at least once a month until I returned my cable box a few weeks ago. Losing this movie was one of the great heartbreaks I have suffered in my 30 years of existence. | IMDB

Coming in the next few days are posts on TV shows and animated shorts based on CanLit.

CanLit on Film – Volume 3

Canadian TV, especially the CBC, has produced numerous TV movies and mini-series based on Canadian writing. It would take forever to list them all, so I have chosen ten highlights (5 today and 5 tomorrow). These are  adaptations that either I have seen or were very popular.

Lives of the Saints

Based on Nino Ricci’s first novel, this CTV miniseries is a very power adaptation of this Governor-General Award winning contemporary Canadian classic. The miniseries has a run time of over 3 hours, so the viewer becomes immersed in the world of this Italian family. This adaptation has a strong cast that is on top of its game, with Sophia Loren in the lead role of Teresa Innocente. It is certainly worth watching and is widely available on DVD. | Trailer | IMDB | DVD

Elizabeth Rex

I saw this TV movie on Bravo about 3 years ago, but I think it was originally produced by CBC. This adaptation of Timothy Findley’s award winning play translated very well onto the small screen, likely because the source is a high-production value stage play. The cast is solid, it is very faithful to Findley’s book, and the movie is, above all, entertaining. | IMDB | DVD

Billy Bishop Goes to War

This 2010 TV movie was one of CBC’s best CanLit adaptations in recent years. It stars the playwrights – John Gray and Eric Peterson – and sticks to the original source script and score. The actors, while getting on in years, can still elevate Canada’s first war hero, Billy Bishop, like no one else. CBC also made an adaptation in 1982, but I have yet to see it. Unfortunately, this has not yet been released on DVD. | Trailer | IMDB

St. Urbain’s Horseman

This 2007 three hour miniseries adaptation of my favorite Mordecai Richler book is an absolute delight to watch. I bought this for myself as a Christmas present last year and have watched it at least once a month since. The casting is perfect (they all have their names above the title on the DVD box, but I haven’t heard of any of them), the pacing is spot-on, and the right amount of liberties are taken to effectively adapt this goliath of a novel for the small screen. If you have a free Saturday and feel like wrapping yourself in the warm sardonic blanket of Mordecai Richler’s wit, watch Duddy Kravitz, this movie, and Barney’s Version (and if you are lucky enough, watch Joshua Then and Now as well). Of the various Richler adaptations, I think this is my favorite. | IMDB | DVD

The Englishman’s Boy

Produced by CBC in 2008 and starring Bob Hoskins (yes, Mario himself), this mini-series adapts Guy Vanderhaeghe’s Governor-General Award winning historical novel. I forgot this existed until I started these CanLit film posts. I have ordered the DVD and will report back once I watch it (it does look quite good). | Trailer | IMDB | DVD

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