Canada Reads 2015 – Picks and Predictions

This is the second time that I’ve read all of the Canada Reads finalists before the show starts, the last being 2011. Even when I haven’t read all the books, I’ll still usually make a pick on who I’d like to see win. In the weeks leading up to the 2015 edition of the program, I re-listened to every year from the beginning for a second time in the last few months to get some insight (and because I just generally enjoy the old broadcasts). The difficulty I’m having this year in picking who I think will win is that I don’t know anything about any of the panelists, in fact I haven’t even heard of any of them…the only thing I knew about them is that Martha Wainwright is Rufus’s little sister.

Before I make my picks and predictions, here are some very brief thoughts on each of the books and their pros and cons that will likely come up during the debates:

When Everything Feels Like the Movies – A very strong book with a strong pedigree even though it’s only a year old: the first Young-Adult novel on the show, the GG winner for Children’s lit and a magnet for controversy. Raziel Reid’s novel is an unflinching look at a fascinating character. The “message” of the book is one that can easily stand up to debate but the somewhat graphic nature of the language and sexuality may be its Achilles heel. I’m hoping the discussion delves deep into the complexities of Jude.

Intolerable: A Memoir of Extremes – An excellent look at the immigrant experience and the contemporary Middle East. Kamal Al-Solaylee’s memoir successfully takes on a lot of topics – being an Arab, being gay in an intolerant society, making Canada your adoptive home, assimilation, and the complexities of immigrant family relationships. The one con in my opinion is that the book would be very interesting to those interested in politics and the Middle East, but this may not appeal to everyone. I’m also wondering about the classic argument that’s sometimes dragged out on the show that this book is “too Toronto.”

Ru – Kim Thuy’s novel was a GG winner for French fiction and shortlisted for the Giller after it was translated. It is the story of a Vietnamese immigrant in Quebec coming to peace with the life she has led and what faces her in the future. This book was told through vignettes that more so resembled prose poems than fiction. While the prose was beautiful, this book is, as I said in my review, an example of form over function. I think that the underdeveloped characters and scattered narrative will make it hard for Ru to make it far in the debates.

And the Birds Rained Down – Jocelyne Saucier’s look at living and dying on your own terms. This was the most “traditional” novel of the three on the list. While the themes were fascinating and some of the characters really interesting, the novel started much stronger than it ended. This was a very heavy book that dealt with huge themes but seemed almost incapable of interjecting some humour in something that really is a clearly humerous – I mean, a bunch of old people are living in the woods running a pot farm!

The Inconvenient Indian – The best known of the five books, and Thomas King being the best known author of the five, is clearly seen by the peanut gallery as the front runner. This was a fascinating book with accessible language and logical arguments. For me, this book really did break barriers, which is the goal of this season. But, the real weakness is that this book is not a narrative like the three novels and memoir, so it will be difficult to compare with the other titles in the same way. Of course, this could also be an advantage because it will force it to stand out.

So here are my thoughts:

Ru and And the Birds Rained Down were my least favorite and I think will be the first two to be voted off.

When Everything Feels Like the Movies is the dark-horse. This is a powerful book that I could easily see winning or in the final two.

The Inconvenient Indian is the frontrunner for the title. But, as we’ve seen many times in previous editions, the frontrunner rarely wins.

My horse in the race, the book I would like to see win this year is… Intolerable: A Memoir of Extremes by Kamal Al-Solaylee. This was a fantastic book, takes on many stereotypes and issues, and is very timely considering what is going on in the Middle East today. On a more personal level though, this is a very emotional memoir filled with honesty and vulnerability. With Intolerable, you’ll learn something, you’ll feel something, you’ll laugh and cry, and your perceptions will be influenced.

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2 responses

  1. Hi Aaron

    So I was just listening to Canada Reads on CBC Radio and what do you know Wab Kinu quotes from your article. It’s nice when some one recognizes some quality criticism and writing of which I was already aware.

    Congradulations and keep up the good work.

    The Ignorant Intellectual.

  2. congrats on the plug on canada reads buddy.
    theignorantitellectual.

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