Canada Reads 2015 – The Finalists

CanadaReads2015

My only explanation for the selections for both the longlist and the finalists of Canada Reads 2015 is that the producers read my last blog post on the subject and said, “well…we’ll show him.” I jest, but I was very happy with all of the selections for this year and am pleased there was a return to Canada Reads traditions of the past with a mix of well-known and not-so-well-known titles making the list. Also, I was quite happy that the list contained a number of titles from smaller independent publishing houses. In terms of panelists, judging from their opening remarks during the unveiling on Q, I am hopeful that this season’s discussions will return to same literary focus that was more prevalent during the Bill Richardson years.

When the longlist came out, I hadn’t read any of the choices and hadn’t even heard of many, in fact I had only one of the fifteen titles on my shelf, All My Puny Sorrows, so needless to say a few dollars were dropped shortly after the announcement when I bought the entire longlist. This year’s theme, One Book to Break Barriers, was specific enough to give some kind of point of reference but broad enough to allow lots of interpretation in nominations.

So, we have Intolerable: A Memoir of Extremes by Kamal Al-Solaylee, The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America by Thomas King, Ru by Kim Thúy (translated by Sheila Fischman), When Everything Feels like the Movies by Raziel Reid, and And the Birds Rained Down by Jocelyne Saucier (translated by Rhonda Mullins). One of my first choices and four of my second choices were picked from the finalists. So just for some context, here are some interesting tidbits about Canada Reads 2015

  • This is Thomas King’s second title on the show; he joins Mordecai Richler, Margaret Atwood, and Joseph Boyden as authors who have had more than one title appear.
  • This is the first year that two French-Canadian novels have been featured at the same time and the first year since 2010 to feature any French-Canadian books.
  • Ru is Sheila Fischman’s fourth translation to compete. This title is also only the second Governor General’s Award for French Language Fiction to appear.
  • When Everything Feels like the Movies is the first winner of the Governor General’s Award for Children’s Literature to appear on the show and is the first Children’s/Young-Adult/Juvenile/Whatever-you-want-to-call-it book to compete.
  • All of the titles came out in the last five years.

I have not read any of the titles, so I’m devoting the four-weeks prior to the show to pounding through them. All are relatively short so it should be doable. My big worry about this year was the decision to allow both fiction and narrative non-fiction to be chosen; my concern was the comparability of the titles. But, I must say, these five finalists, on the surface anyway prior to reading, seem quite comparable despite the different genres – history, memoir, juvenile, fiction, etc. You can look at these books through the lens of “the other” – being gay, native, or an immigrant; through different life stages – young versus old; and in many of the titles, what does Canada represent.

I’m expecting a heated, yet elevated and respectful debate and I’m hopeful that Wab Kinew will respect his role as moderator and host and not be as loud and brash as he was as a panelist last year. For the first time in a number of years, I’m very excited for the show – especially since Jian Ghomeshi is gone (I’m not just jumping on a bandwagon…I never ever liked him).

The titles I’m most looking forward to reading are The Inconvenient Indian and When Everything Feels like the Movies. The former because of the near universal praise it has received and its interesting take on Native history; and the latter because it’s a genre and subject that is wholly foreign to me so I’m looking forward to something new. Reviews will be coming starting mid-February and once I’ve finished I will of course pick a horse.

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