CanLit on Film – Volume 2

Here is part two of my series of posts on the various adaptations that have been made of Canadian literature. These are the final few theatrical films that I could think of; if I missed any, please feel free to comment (I intentionally excluded Water for Elephants as I have neither seen the movie nor read the book).

The Handmaid’s Tale

The 1990 Volker Schlöndorff adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel was a fantastic film, in my opinion. The screenplay was written by Nobel Prize winning playwright Harold Pinter and the cast is very strong: Robert Duvall, Natasha Richardson, Faye Dunaway, and Aidan Quinn, to name a few. The movie is very faithful to the book and it captures the themes perfectly. I strongly recommend taking this movie in. | Trailer | IMDB | DVD

Field of Dreams

Most random people on the street are shocked when I walk up to them and say “hey, did you know Field of Dreams was based on a Canadian book?” And I understand their shock; it is a very surprising thing to hear. This film was based on the Canadian novel Shoeless Joe by Alberta author W. P. Kinsella and won the then named Books in Canada First Novel Award. This movie is a modern classic and I really have nothing else to add. | Trailer | IMDB | DVD

The Stone Angel

This 2007 adaptation of Margaret Laurence’s first Manawaka novel, penned and directed by Kari Skogland, is an absolute masterpiece of Canadian cinema. Ellen Burstyn becomes Hagar. The film stays reasonably close to the book (the novel is a very “big” story). I was very excited when this was released and I was not disappointed. This was the third adaptation of a Margaret Laurence novel; The Fire-Dwellers is the only Manawaka novel left to be done. Even if you are not familiar with Laurence, you will love this movie. It takes the viewer on an emotional roller coaster, the characters are very well developed, and the acting is phenomenal. | Trailer | IMDB | DVD

Rachel, Rachel

Paul Newman’s 1968 adaptation of Margaret Laurence’s A Jest of God is, I think, the first Hollywood film based on a Canadian book. This movie is marvelous and is one of my all-time favorites. Joanne Woodward masterfully takes on the tragically complex character of Rachel Cameron. Newman crafted a subtle, heartbreaking, and artistic film that is universal, yet very of its time. This was the first film based on a Canadian book to be nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars (as well as Best Adapted Screenplay and for both leading and supporting actresses). | Trailer | IMDB | DVD

The Favorite Game

I saw this adaptation of Leonard Cohen’s autobiographical novel once on TMN in 2004, the year after its limited theatrical release, and have not been able to find it since. This 2003 Canadian film takes today’s award for the most obscure. I cannot find a trailer, cannot find a DVD copy for sale, and cannot find it online. The film is very well done, the acting is well done, and the spirit and themes of the original source are captured. I happened across this film by luck and, honestly, will likely never see it again. It is a pity because it was quite a good movie. If anyone knows where I could obtain a copy, please comment below. | IMDB |

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz

The quintessential classic of Canadian cinema! This is one of my favorite movies. Ted Kotcheff’s 1974 film, starring a young Richard Dreyfuss, is a very faithful adaptation of the Mordecai Richler classic. This film is fast paced, hilarious, and filled with memorable characters. This is a movie that anyone will enjoy. Go watch it (it’s on Netflix). | Trailer | IMDB | DVD

Next post will discuss made-for-TV movies and mini-series based on CanLit

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